Persevering Will Make You Lucky

August 14, 2018

Last week, I saw a former student of mine on a morning talk show. He studied and coached with me for a few years. I got him an agent and he began to audition. After many auditions, he booked a few co-star and guest star roles and then finally he booked a series regular role on TV show, which made him famous. On the talk show, he was asked the pat question, “How did you get the role?” He responded, “I don’t know. Guess I was just lucky.” I wanted to yell at the TV (okay, I did yell at the TV!). “Why don’t you tell them about the four years you spent working your ass off?”

For him to simply brush off all his hard work by saying it was “just luck,” does not tell the whole story; the many hours spent in acting class, the millions of auditions he went on, the rejection and disappointment he had to work through and that “survival job” he hated.

It also sends a message to the aspiring actors out there watching that all they need is “luck” to be successful. Leaving out the key to success; hard work, commitment, passion and courage.

The word “luck” is thrown out there a lot, especially in Hollywood.

You hear it time and time again: “Oh, he was just lucky…to get that call, that meeting, that audition, that role.” Or worse yet, when the actors themselves say, “I guess I was just lucky!”

In fact, many would suggest that all you need to make it in Hollywood is luck; that it’s strictly a numbers game and a matter of being in the right place at the right time.

Actually, there is something to luck. I do believe in the idea of luck when it comes to our individual lives. We experience luck every day. Luck is when you win the lottery or when you avoid injury in a serious accident. Luck is when you’re speeding and you zoom by a cop… just as he looks away. Luck is a cosmic blend of fate, karma and forces beyond your control leading you to (or helping you avoid) certain life paths, choices and events that will ultimately propel you to your destiny.

When it comes to your acting career, however, luck is very different. In your career, luck is something that you can help shape. You can bring luck on to yourself by putting out positive intentions. Positive intentions bring positive outcomes.

For an actor pursuing an acting career:

Luck is when preparation meets opportunity!

Write that down in your Actor’s Journal. Read it again. In fact, say it out loud. This is a mantra I use and truly believe in. I’ve seen proof of it through the years. I’ve seen so many actors create their own luck simply by working hard, by being ready, by persevering.

If you work hard, luck will come your way. So you better be prepared. At some point, you will get an opportunity to meet the right people, audition for the perfect role, and book the job that will launch your career. You owe it to yourself and all the hard work you’ve done to be ready for the occasion.

Let me give you a concrete example of what I mean. An actor in my class told a story about a producer who came into his restaurant, where he was waiting tables. This actor had been working hard at his career for a few years. He was devoted to his training and he was always auditioning. He was talking with the producer about his acting career. The producer liked him and thought he was perfect for a role on his show. He called him in to audition the next day. The actor went home, got his sides, worked on his material, coached with me early the next morning, and went to the audition completely prepared. He booked the role.

As my student told this story in class, another student said, “Boy, were you lucky!

That’s not luck! That actor was prepared for when the opportunity presented itself and that preparation paid off.

Luck starts with you putting it out there, stating exactly what you Want, what your goal is. You declare it to yourself, your friends, your family, your acting coach, the universe. It can be anything from your overall goal of being a successful actor to more individual goals like getting an agent or landing a good audition. You tell everyone, you make that goal your top priority, and you put yourself in the mindset that you WILL accomplish that goal.

Once you accept the notion that you can create and orchestrate your own luck, it puts your destiny back into your own hands.


Scott SeditaAbout Scott Sedita – Whether you’re auditioning for a co-star or a series regular on a half hour comedy, sitcom guru and acting coach Scott Sedita will teach you The Sedita Method of sitcom acting, which comes with it’s own terminology, coined phrases and unique glossary.

Scott’s internationally best-selling book, “The Eight Characters of Comedy. A Guide to Sitcom Acting & Writing, 2nd Edition” has sold over 100,000 copies and has become a “bible” to Hollywood comedy writers, directors, producers, and actors and is used as a textbook in over 100 colleges and universities. Find Scott and his staff of professional actors, teachers and coaches at ScottSeditaActing.com.

Inside Circle Seminar: Four Ways The Acting Center Reinvents The Acting Workshop

August 10, 2018

Over the years, there’s been much debate about acting workshops. Are they worth your time and money? What makes one school of acting better than another?  Why should I listen to an acting coach who isn’t a celebrity?

More than anything, an acting workshop is supposed to bring out the most powerful emotions a performer has to offer. It’s supposed to train an actor to reveal themselves during casting calls and auditions. As Jesse Eisenberg once said, “In acting class, you’re trained to express yourself as much as you can.”

However, this often becomes a difficult task. With the unique biases of an acting coach, a performer strives to fit the sensibilities of another. As a result, they neglect or suppress the innate emotions that are begging to be released.

This struggle is something Eric Methany and Tamra Meskimen are well aware of. As founders of The Acting Center in Los Angeles, the two have made it their mission to alter the perception of what an acting workshop can be.

Through scene studies, improv and private coaching, the pair have taken the focus away from criticism. Instead, the center teaches performers to rely on their own instincts and imagination.  

This past July, Casting Frontier partnered with The Acting Center for a day-long seminar. There, Eric and Tamra discussed and demonstrated The Acting Center’s unique approach to acting roles. In case you missed the class, here are 4 important lessons from the day.

Acting Jobs Come From Acting More

Both Eric and Tamra have been acting since they were teenagers. As the years went on, and they attended a variety of acting workshops, they kept coming across a common denominator. Acting classes tended to have more talking than acting.  It was a trend they wanted to avoid when starting their own studio space.

“Actors get better at acting when they act,” Eric says. “We spent three years researching everything we could about acting and acting jobs. In the end, we knew that learning by doing was the best approach.”

The pair like to tell the story of their very first acting workshop 15 years ago. In a dingy, cramped space above a 7-Eleven, Eric and Tamra took 17 actors through a six-week course. By avoiding the excessive analysis that often bogs down a performer, they watched as nearly every actor booked a role before the end of the six weeks.

For them, this was a strong sign for action over analysis. It’s an approach they practice and encourage to this day.

Acting Roles Require Being Another Person

A question that both an acting coach and a performer often wrestle with is what is acting? How do you define it?

For Eric and Tamra, this question was the prime obstacle they had to tackle. Like the technique itself, there are thousands of interpretations of what the responsibilities of an actor are.  

Bette Davis said, “Without wonder and insight, acting is just a trade. With it, it becomes creation.” Whereas Meryl Streep remarked, “Acting is finding the similarity in what is different, then finding myself there.”

Yes, these are beautiful statements. But, they are also what Eric and Tamra feel contribute to actor confusion. Eric and Tamra didn’t want personal, abstract definitions. Instead, they were searching for an explanation of acting roles that was practical and actionable.

For them, the simplest, most accurate definition of acting is becoming another person. It is about changing one’s identity. And for Eric and Tamra, this is already a tool people use on a daily basis.

In their view, life is about performance. In each situation, individuals take on different personas that will allow them to thrive and survive in the world. Performers should not think of acting as some mysterious element to be deciphered. Rather, they should think of scenes and auditions as everyday situations. Instead of asking what am I supposed to be, ask who am I supposed to be. From there, you can enhance character emotion, and improve dialog.

An Acting Workshop That Avoids Criticism

In the early days of The Acting Center, Eric and Tamra asked themselves can we teach acting without criticism? Traditionally, acting has been taught on a performance and critique basis. An actor performs, and someone then describes what they liked or didn’t like about the performance.

For Eric and Tamra though, criticism, at least as it pertains to acting, has often caused more harm than good. “The only thing you learn from a critique, is what the person critiquing you is like,” Tamra says.

Objectivity, especially when it comes to the arts, is nonexistent. With each unique perspective comes its own unique biases. According to Eric and Tamra, from a critique you learn much about the likes, dislikes and overall sensibilities of the critic. However, you learn very little about yourself. How are you supposed to learn new skills if you’re always shaping your performance to the narrow worldview of one particular audience?

Now, Eric and Tamra know this can be a difficult pill to swallow. After all, if you don’t tell actors what they’re doing wrong they won’t improve. More likely than not, casting calls will not be a walk in the park for them.

Often, people present them with the analogy of math and building a bridge. If you use the wrong math, then the bridge will collapse. For Eric and Tamra though, acting jobs are not math.

Art is all about opinion. And when it comes to opinion, there is no good or bad. When you visit a museum, there are some things you like and others you don’t. But, all these works exist in a museum. They’re still considered art.

This is why the pair feel criticism hinders an actor’s innate creative spark. By eliminating criticism, a performer can work faster, better and stronger. Or, as The Acting Center dubs it, The Daft Punk method.

“We have a model that does not follow the critique system,” Eric says. “Our class doesn’t bow to an acting coach trying to mold a performer into their image of what an artist is. We want people to find their own road. That’s what makes stars. People who know what they’re doing, and have faith in their work.”

Character Commitment Is The Key To Acting Jobs

Of course, Eric and Tamra know how debilitating criticism can be. Once someone’s bais enters an actor’s mindset, everything can be thrown off. Instead of exploring something new and unique, the actor censers themselves. In an attempt to head off any criticism, they interrupt scenes and auditions by breaking character.

Eric and Tamra feel this is a mistake. In their opinion, to overcome insecurity on set and during casting calls, one must fully commit to their character. For them, this is the best solution to combat criticism.

They give the example of playing a Boston firefighter. In this situation, the accent is the most difficult part. Instead of throwing up your hands and breaking the scene out of frustration, go with it. Don’t think of the tonal differences as a flaw. Instead, use frustration to your advantage. Come up with a reason for why this accent is a bit off. What happened in this character’s life that made their voice sound like that.

“A character is a living person,” Eric says. “We have to convince the audience that we are this person. By committing fully to the character, you are moving past the insecurity that comes with criticism.”

For Eric and Tamra, it is this commitment that increases an actor’s chances for success.

Wrapping up with Eric Methany and Tamra Meskimen

Russell Crowe has said, “The important thing to me is that I’m not slowed down by people’s criticism. I’m just trying to work at the highest level I can.”

In the realm of art and performance, criticism is everywhere. The danger of this being its potential stranglehold on originality. More than anything, Eric and Tamra’s acting workshop encourages performers to avoid relying on the biases of others. Instead, listen to your gut. Immerse yourself in the character, and and allow your emotions to guide you in the right direction.  

 

SCRIPT ANALYSIS: Part 1 – Actors! You Really Should Know What You’re Talking About

July 17, 2018

JULY_Frontier_Insider.2018_Header

Two Questions:

If you were given the instruction manual for a new product but the manual was meant for a completely different product, do you think you’d have much success properly operating that product?

If you landed in a foreign city and were given the map to a completely different city, would you be able to navigate the streets of that city very well?

Answer:
Not likely!

Holding a script that you haven’t correctly analyzed is like holding the wrong instruction manual or trying to navigate with the wrong map. Imagine being handed a script for one scene in an audition but after reading it you then deliver a read that’s completely different from the scene as it is written. Now, would you purposely do that? Of course not. However, it happens all the time. Right now, just as you’re reading this article, there are actors all over this city, and beyond, misreading their copy, and as a result… blowing their reads as well as their chances of winning their auditions (let alone the room). Not a very good situation to be in.

Resolve:
Continue reading this article for a deeper insight into the prevention of this chronic actor ailment.

WRITER’S INTENT – THE BLUEPRINT

We’re going to cut to the core of script analysis in order for this teaching to empower you with the tools necessary to understand copy as the writer had intended it; we call this Writer’s Intent or Given Set of Circumstances.
Writer’s intent is similar to the blueprint for a building project. If you don’t follow the blueprint during construction, the end result will not turn out to be exactly what the designer had initially envisioned. In telling a story on film, it’s the writer’s job to provide the roadmap or blueprint, and it’s the actor’s job to stick to that blueprint. That is if your intention is to bring the story to life as the writer originally envisioned it.

 

Of course, actors are always looking for ways to make strong and interesting choices in order to stand out. In and of itself, the bold act of making interesting choices is not a bad thing. However, it’s important to remember that interesting choices can’t directly conflict with the given circumstances and must line up with the story’s original intent or there’s going to be issues. What kind of issues? The kind of issues that will prevent you from getting called back.
Remember: It’s not the job of the actor to change the blueprint… even if you think you have come up with something better. You must first understand what’s on the page before you can nuance what’s on the page.

AUDITION TIP

Never criticise or insult the writing during an audition. The writer could be in the room! If you honestly feel the writing is subpar and you’re still willing to audition for the project, then prepare something nice to say about the script ahead of time, such as “I am excited to be working on this material right now.”

I often remind actors in my studio to consider the writer as the smartest person on the project. Remember, more often than not, writers have worked very hard and labored long hours over word choice, syntax, grammar and placement of punctuations. It’s out of this general respect for all the hard work committed by the writer that the actor should seek to honor writer’s intent.

If you feel judgemental over the quality of the writing you’re only building up obstacles that can prevent you from really analyzing the script and digging out all the nuggets. Sometimes the simple act of believing that the writer is the smartest person on the project will open your eyes to things in the script that you hadn’t seen before and you’ll end up elevating the writing through your performance. Just as bringing the character to life is your performance art, the writer’s art are the words on the page. Honor them!

SCRIPT ANALYSIS

Now that we’ve established that the script is the blueprint for an actor’s performance we can set about the daunting task of reading this blueprint. Because, after all, a blueprint is completely useless if you don’t know how to read it. In other words, we know that it’s the job of the actor to understand writer’s intent, but how exactly do we know what the intent is? The process of figuring out writer’s intent is called script analysis.

As actors, we need to be able to read a script and understand all of its ins and outs, its literal and suggested content, its text and subtext and all of its detail. Basically, it’s our job as actors to be able to properly decipher and then communicate to the audience what the writer wants to communicate through the story. This is a tall order, and for some actors, decoding and analyzing story is incredibly intimidating. If this applies to you, don’t worry… we’ll take it step by step so by the time you’ve finished with this article you should have a lot more of the tools necessary to become a better interpreter of copy, script, and, story and as a result you’ll become a better actor!

ANALYSIS BEGINS WITH STORY

It’s true. Everything is all about story! Any actor who’s studied with me for even a little while knows that I fervently reinforce that everything, everywhere, all the time, has always been — always is — and will always be — about STORY! Think about how we communicate in everyday life: What’s your story? Would you like to hear a story? What’s the latest news story? Let me tell you what happened. Look at this picture. Check me out on Facebook and Instagram. Look at all of my photos, videos, blogs, and status updates. It’s all story!

And, that’s exactly how we’ve all been constructed. We’re built to respond to story. So, keeping all of this in mind, can you see how having a better understanding of story will empower you in your ability as an actor to tell stories? It should.

So let’s talk story.

Without turning this into a writing intensive I’d like to point out that there’s a general agreement amongst writers that there are really only a small handful of basic story plot structures that simply get reinvented over and over again. Some believe that there are only seven basic stories, some think that it tops off at twelve. Director Ron Howard makes the statement that there might only be one! Regardless of the number you come to, the bottom line is that there aren’t that many. As an actor it would greatly benefit you to learn these stories and become proficient at recognizing their patterns and identifying their structures. Doing so will definitely help you when it comes time to analyzing a script. If you’re serious about diving deeper into this topic, here’s a great blog-post I came across by Neil Perkin. Neil’s post is a good jumping off point in your study of basic plot and story because he presents an argument for seven core story structures as well as a couple opposing views. He also provides links to further resources that you can reference for a deeper understanding.

This particular post is titled How Many Stories

If after reading How Many Stories you still want to learn more, or confuse yourself a little further… then read Damien Walter’s post titled Two. Four. Seven. More. How Many Stories Are There? Damien also provides resources for the monomyth theory (the argument that there may only be one type of story).

The more you dive into the research the more you’ll find there is contention over the number of different stories there may be. But remember, as actors, knowing the number doesn’t matter… being educated in story structure is what matters. So take some time, do the research, learn the difference between a story that’s about overcoming a monster, and a story about a journey. Having this knowledge will greatly benefit you as you journey through the analysis of scripts.

There’s so much more to properly understanding story for effective auditioning. However we’ll pick this up in Part 2 of this teaching. But for now, the first step is to raise your awareness of script analysis and writer’s intent. Don’t miss this because you want to focus on memorizing your lines. Instead, develop proper cold reading skills you can count on and spend the little time you don’t usually have prior to your audition on the understanding of scene-story as well as the character’s story. Doing so will take you so much further than simply giving a memorized read. Take your time, put in the work and you won’t be that actor who doesn’t know what they’re talking about.


Clay BanksClay Banks is a former Fortune 500 Business & Life Empowerment Coach, a Motivational Speaker and Consultant. After a successful eighteen year acting career, he founded Clay Banks Productions & Studio International (CBSI) where he’s the Head Coach offering ongoing on-camera acting classes. He’s presently a recurring Master Coach at SAG-AFTRA Headquarters as well as a regular-guest Master Class Auditioning Coach with the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Hollywood.

Prepare to Succeed By Building Your Professional Team and Support System

June 14, 2018

I learned this equation as a kid, and it is still the most valuable math lesson I have ever been taught. Success is not a fluke. It is the result of countless hours spent in preparation for the opportunity of a lifetime. We must prepare for success in order to seize it. A big part of preparing to succeed is putting in place the people and the infrastructure to keep your enterprise afloat. Even before your career is fully off the ground, you need to assemble the team that is best-suited to take you to the top. Some people make the mistake of waiting for opportunity to arrive before seeking out support. Surely you’ve heard the horror stories of successful individuals who somehow lost it all and later discovered the people they called friends were taking them for everything they had. Support is easy to obtain after the fact, that is, after you have attained success. Just ask MC Hammer. But the people you want to have on your team are those who truly believe in you, so much so that they are willing to accompany you on your journey to greatness, starting at the ground floor. In essence, they are investing in your future. They give their time and energy to help you fulfill your potential, and only when you succeed with their support will they get a return on their investment.

So let’s talk about who you need on your team.

  • Devil’s Advocate – The much-needed opposite of a “Yes Man,” this is the person who you can always count on to give it to you straight. Since straight-talk can hurt feelings, this person needs to be someone you trust implicitly and who has weathered a few storms with you. When everyone else is telling you to go right, your devil’s advocate will help you consider the possibility of going left. Ultimately, the decision is yours, but at least it will be an informed one.
  • Cheerleader – Whether you didn’t land the role you wanted or you don’t like your new headshots, this is the person who will always help you find the silver lining in a bad situation. Your cheerleader is not there to enable delusion, but rather to help you maintain perspective. Especially in this industry, you’re going to need a reality check to keep you grounded in what matters and to avoid losing yourself in what casting thinks of you.
  • An Agent – Obviously, right? But not just any agent will do. You and your agent need to be on the same page about the direction of your career. If you see yourself as an ingénue and your agent is submitting you for villains, then there’s a mismatch. Of course, one school of thought might encourage you to take whatever you can get. But how committed will you be to landing roles you don’t see yourself playing? Remember that you and your agent are in a partnership. Therefore, it’s best to find an agent that understands your brand and can find you the roles that allow you to shine.
  • Mentor – You need to have a person on your team who has walked the path you’re traveling and can alert you to potential pitfalls ahead. A good mentor will be a sounding board for the ideas you have about your career, never telling you what to do, but serving as a fountain of knowledge and experience to help you make the best decision for you. Whether by directly advising you with tips to improve your odds of success, or indirectly by connecting you to others in the industry with a good referral, your mentor can be an invaluable resource.
  • Hollywood Outsider – We’ve all heard of those folks who “go Hollywood,” and it never seems to be a good a thing. Having someone in your circle who could care less about who’s who in Hollywood will remind you that there is life outside of acting. So whenever you need to get away for a minute, your Hollywood Outsider can give you the balance you need to refill your tank from the depletion of Hollywood.

Diane Christiansen’s career spans four decades as an actress, coach, director, dancer and author. Diane began coaching actors in 1992 and in 2011 and 2012, Diane’s classes were voted the best acting class for kids and teens separately by Backstage The last three years, Diane was voted One of the Top 10 most effective Coaches in Hollywood by Actors Access. A graduate of the Strasberg Institute, she was mentored by Academy Award Nominee, Sally Kirkland and the late Joseph Bernard. Actively coaching “working ” actors of all ages has led to 90% of her student roster booking jobs consistently.

Visit Diane at DianeChristiansen.com or call 818.523.8283 to sign up for one her classes.

An Audition is Not a Test

May 25, 2018

An audition is your time to perform for the purpose of showing how you would do a part in a film, TV show, commercial, etc. It is a chance to show a sample of your creative work.

While this is a simple definition, it is an important way to view auditions. Surprisingly, even many experienced actors we talk to don’t.

Even if the actor is skilled and well trained, develops a character that fits the story and genre, has rehearsed enough to make what’s on the page come to life and is excited about the audition— something happens once they arrive at the audition. That something can be the difference between booking and not.

Once in the room, if the actor veers away from “showing a sample of their creative work” and the focus becomes “Do they think I’m good enough? Will I book it? What do they think about me? Are they judging me? Will this pay the rent?”, the actor dramatically weakens their ability to do what they are there to do: create a spontaneous and real living moment as this character. In other words, PERFORM.

An audition is a performance.

From an acting perspective, the only difference between an audition and other performances is the size of the audience.

An audition is a chance to show how you would create and perform the role. There isn’t a “right” way to perform it. There is the way you as the artist, the actor and the creator of the character would perform it, should you get the part. It’s your take on the character and their approach to life. It’s a sample of your creative work.

In the audition, the more you are focused on and participating in the life of the character you created, the more you and your audience (Casting Director, Producer, Director, etc.) will have a real and rewarding experience as the performance plays out, the more they will want to see you perform it again in whatever it is they are casting and the more they will want their audience to see you perform it.

Experiencing an actor being a character who is fully living life in an authentic and engaged way is what any audience member—from a ticket buyer on Broadway to a Casting Director on the Paramount Lot—responds to.

Focusing on doing consistently strong work that contributes to a story—and doing what you love—is not only personally artistically rewarding, it will win you respect from your peers, booked jobs —and perhaps even a big, fat movie star career and paycheck.

An audition is a sample of what you do. Do it with confidence and commitment. Let casting make a choice based on what you do and how you do it, not based on you trying to “do it right.”

If you need help refining what you do in auditions, reach out to The Acting Center. We’re experts at isolating trouble spots and helping you deliver consistently stronger and more effective auditions that lead to more bookings.


 


The Acting CenterThe Acting Center helps actors to gain control over their work, teaching them to rely on their own instincts, imagination and choices. Our scene study and improv classes produce confident actors who bring an original voice to every production.

In fact, the most distinctive thing about an Acting Center student is how different each one is. We train actors to speak in their own artistic voice—producing characters that are rich and layered. They become the artist they always wanted to be.

Theater, television and film are all collaborative mediums, so an actor must work well with other actors, directors, casting directors and many more. Our technique trains them to do just that! That’s why directors love to work with Acting Center students.

 

 

Branding Yourself

May 18, 2018

When you think of yourself as an actor, do you think of yourself as your “brand?” Or do you think of yourself as an actor who is more interested in expanding your boundaries; someone who is committed to developing the skills and artistry to play the widest range of roles possible with equal strength and believability? The way you answer that question may tell you whether you are more committed to your acting or to your marketing.

When I worked at Halpern and Associates talent agency, actors we met would sometimes tell us their “brand.” We appreciated their awareness of what they could do, but we only represented strong, versatile actors. We wouldn’t send every client out for every role, of course, but we did expect every client to be great in every role we did submit them for. We never considered signing anyone who felt strongly connected to only one part of their personalities. Casting always loved our actors because they were so much more than a brand. When they would call to hire an actor they would talk about how the actor expanded the possibilities of the role, gave it dimension; they would thank us for sending them a “real actor.”

Casting director Gayle Keller, (The Big Sick, Trainwreck, Louie) has this to say to actors: “You don’t need to worry about your brand. Just be as prepared, interesting and true to yourself in the role as you can be. The bottom line is that you have to show that you’re skilled and interesting.” This is especially true in today’s marketplace. With the writing and the overall quality of what we now call television being better than ever, actors are expected to bring more than they ever have to the audition and to the role. Gayle agreed with every other casting director I spoke to. They expect no less than a fully embodied human being in the audition and ultimately will hire you for the roles they think you are right for – your brand doesn’t matter to them.

Brad Gilmore, known for casting such films as Girlfriend and A Bag of Hammers, prefers actors who are willing to show all of themselves and their talent, “When you audition for me, I’d rather not have you try to trick me into thinking you’re this or that type. I want to see someone who has prepared extensively to bring the role to him or herself. If you’re presenting a brand you’re putting up a barrier between us and I can’t get to know the real you. It’s not acting, it’s a sales pitch and I’m not buying.”

The concrete nature of branding is also at odds with the constantly changing energy of life and the fluid nature of creativity. Living a life focused on putting forth a small, fixed idea of yourself can cause you to become rigid and non-adaptive, separated from the natural rhythm of human experience. You sacrifice your spirit of creativity, your artistry and your flexibility in the interest of pushing this prepackaged picture of yourself on the world. This compromises your overall power and effectiveness as an artist.

True actors spend their time not focusing on defending and selling a brand, but rather doing the work that allows them to go more deeply and more meaningfully into themselves and their acting. They are creatives who are always looking break out of the cage of branding and play with big boys, the real actors. They have an awareness of who they are and what they can play, but they never narrow themselves down to a brand because they know that a brand is far from the whole story they have to tell. They know that it’s short sighted for actors to lose their focus as creative beings because they think they’ve discovered part of themselves that may sell.

One of my students looks like a big threatening biker. He’s well over 6 feet tall, heavily muscled and tatted. He auditions for, and books, the roles that you’d expect. That said, he’s never thought that that’s all he could play and he never stops looking for ways to expand himself as an actor. Recently he was asked to audition for a recurring role as a lawyer on a network show! Because he never bought into the smallness of branding and seeing himself as just the “mean biker,” he was able to easily tap into what he needed to audition for the role of a lawyer – and to book it.

Dale Raoul, a character actress well known for her work in True Blood, Under the Dome and now Heathers takes a similar stance. “Why put limits on yourself? Being typecast is somewhat unavoidable primarily based on what you look like. Let the outside world pigeonhole you. The job of the actor is to use imagination to explore a myriad of different personalities. This year alone I’ve played everything from a rich society matron to a down- and- out hoarder. What could be more fun or challenging?”

Without question, marketing is important to any actor’s career. But, is it more important than the dedication it takes to be to being a skilled and compelling actor? In order to succeed as an actor, not just as a commodity, you need to be spending your time living with your eyes open, leaning into new experiences, growing and training to be that special actor who can breathe real life into any role you audition for. Before you start planning how to tell people about yourself, you need to have honed your awareness of the many facets of yourself and of your talent. If casting can see from your auditions that you are a grounded, confident, compelling and fully embodied actor– you’ll become the person they have to hire. This is what actors who see this as their career aspire to and work toward. And that’s the only “brand” you need to be.

 


Craig WallaceCraig Wallace’s background in script development combined with his 16 years of coaching actors enables him to find the job getting moments that others miss. His expertise in breaking down text and years of coaching experience has made him “L.A.’s go to private coach.” Sign up for his group or private classes at wallaceauditiontechnique.com.

 

 

 

A Guide on How to Book a Role

May 17, 2018

There is never enough time to be ready for an audition, especially when it’s the one you’ve been waiting for… the one you really want. When an audition comes, you usually have at most one day with the sides to be ready to prove you’re the right pick for the role.

There is a tangible reality, the more you do something the better you get at it.

The more you audition, the better you get at it. The reason being, you are practicing your preparation and discovering what connects and disconnects you to living in the moment. Some characters will be easier and some will be harder.

It’s important to work many kinds of scenes that challenge you. This way you stretch your skill set so you can grasp a range of abilities that support mastering your auditions. The more roles you feel you have rehearsed and worked, the more resources you have to pull from. Your preparation time will shorten the more you practice.

But the fact remains: You must be working on your acting skill prior to actually getting any audition. Being great is allowing yourself to be free to become the choice that will bring the character to life. And it’s up to you to discover it.

Knowing how to prepare for the audition is half the battle. Here are some steps for your preparation.

1) First breathe. Don’t overthink the sides when you first get them. First breathe, relax, and be.

2) Simply read the scene for what is on the page. Find out everything you can about the script. You’ll want to answer these simple questions:

  1. What genre is it: sitcom, film drama, procedural, etc.?
  2. Who are you?
  3. What’s the backstory, what just happened?
  4. Who are you talking to and what is the relationship?
  5. Where are you, what’s the environment?

These simple questions are important and will give you an understanding of the scene. If one or two aren’t evident it is up to you to take clues from the material to decipher its code. This is why being able to analyze a script is so important.

3) Get up and play with a moment before. Experience where the character is emotionally and look for any changes in the feelings of the character. Are they winning or losing their scene objective?

4) Remember to listen and never plan your reactions. Respond organically from listening and hearing in the moment to what they are saying and what it means to you in the scene.

5) Explore and play. Try different choices. Pick the strongest choice that reflects what is most meaningful within the truth of the script.

6) Eliminate any negative thinking, any doubt that you may have in yourself. Run with the love of the process of discovery.

7) See each audition as a learning experience and give yourself plenty of room in your heart to enjoy them. Know that growing as an artist comes with the journey of booking sometimes and not booking sometimes. It’s fun to act. Remember, every time you audition, you get to act!

Ultimately you book your dream role, as an actor, by preparing your whole life for it. You never know when it’s coming. It could be next year, in two years, many years down the line or even tomorrow.

Stay focused on what you want and don’t let the disappointments get the best of you. Oftentimes, auditions are opportunities to practice on the way to becoming the actor that makes an impact on the world.

For more on how to book the role and build your skill to achieve your artistic and career goals, get Kimberly’s book, Acting with Impact: Power Tools to Ignite the Actor’s Performance. Available at Samuel French Bookshop and at actingwithimpact.com.

 


Kimberly Jentzen is a multiple winner of Back Stage Reader’s Choice Awards: “Favorite Acting Coach,” “Favorite Acting Teacher” and “Best of: Acting Coach”. She has directed and/or developed over a dozen plays, including Yolanda King’s critically acclaimed homage to her father, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Achieving The Dream. Kimberly won a Best Direction award from the Actors Film Festival for Reign. Reign went on to win nine awards including Best Short and Audience Favorite from the Louisville International Film Festival and New York Independent Film Festival. She also garnered awards for her film, Of Earth & Sky. She is the author of Acting with Impact and Life Emotion Cards, available at Samuel French Bookstore and at Amazon.com.

 

The Role That Got Away

April 16, 2018

As actors, we audition, but we don’t always get the role. This is part of the job. Sometimes we may not even be in the running, and other times we get so close we can smell craft services.

The director, casting director, or producer may respond positively; they may seem to love you. You’re moving forward in the process. You perform for more members of their team in callbacks. They laugh, cry, are moved as you audition for them again.

Your agent calls: you’re “pinned”, or you’re the “top choice”, or “it’s down to you and just a couple of others, but they love you!”

You think to yourself, “This is it! I got this role!”

Alas, your agent calls and breaks the news that they “went another way.”

After hearing this, it can be hard to accept the compliments your agent relays about how much they “love your work.”  All that resonates in your mind is that you didn’t get it.

This can sometimes lead one to look inward– wondering, “what did I do wrong?  Why aren’t I as good as that other actor?  What am I missing? Is it my look?  Are my dreams of playing roles like that just delusions?”  Etc., etc., etc.

This trip down “Self-Doubt Lane” is crippling to an artist.

So what can one do about it?

The Artistic Facts

Let’s break this down into facts:

FACT 1

If you don’t feel confident about how to consistently create a character and perform it in a compelling way, then you need to learn workable, reliable facts (not opinions) about the process of acting. 

These facts are exactly what we teach at The Acting Center.

In the above scenario, understanding what acting is wasn’t the problem. You did great. They legitimately loved you!  They actually do admire your work.

Throw any question of “am I good enough?” out the window. That was not the problem.

Hold on to the fact that you performed a character that was  admired, and was engaging, exciting or moving.

This is the reason why you continued to be in the running.  You did your job well.

FACT 2.

Final casting decisions are made in relationship to many things that have nothing to do with the actor’s skills or performance. 

Behind the scenes of a casting process there are many “cooks in the kitchen”. The director, producer, studio or network all have their own ideas about the way the meal should come together. This relates to every aspect of the show – the style, lighting, shooting style, how the characters look or sound together, how they contrast with or complement each other, and on and on.

There are also financial considerations; how much money this or that actor will require, based on their popularity.

All these things, of course, are outside of your control.

The aspects that one can control are in preparing and researching the character, and in doing a great audition.

Again, in the scenario above, you already made it through many hoops. They called you in because you were the look and type of person they wanted. You survived the process as long as you did because you performed well, and they liked your take on the role.

Whatever behind-the-scenes factors played a part in another actor being considering a better choice is something you could not have predicted or controlled, and has nothing to do, really, with your “rightness” or “wrongness” for this particular part.

So skip the self-doubt! You did great work; they know it, you know it. You may not have booked the job, but you very likely made some new fans that will think of you for other roles in the future.

FACT 3.

The freedom to make personal choices as to how something should look, feel or come together is necessary to achieving effective art. 

This is a key point in letting go of any concerns about “the role that got away.”

Let’s say you had a show that you were casting. Wouldn’t you want to have full artistic control on who was cast in each role, so it would come together the way you envisioned it?

This is one of the realities of the casting process: the creators get to choose the cast that works best for their vision, or for the vision of the creative team as a whole.

It is also one of the rules of making any art: one is free to choose what is made and how.

The freedom to make choices is part of the joy of artistic creation.

Your individual choices and ideas are actually what make your work desired and admired.

If one allows that freedom to exist in one’s own work, one must allow for others to have that same freedom in theirs.

Focus On What’s Next

Now that the “almost booked” audition is behind you, it’s time to focus on the future.

If you feel you could be more confident or consistent in creating characters and performing them, don’t wait–get into class!

If that role you lost is still something you would like to tackle, work on that type of role in class. You could find or get someone to write a short scene with that type of character and work on it in class.  You can even shoot it for your reel so that others can you envision you in this kind of role.

Lastly, realize that there are no lack of characters as alive and interesting as that one that “got away.” New scripts and roles are written every day, and if you are actively honing your craft, you will be ready for them when you get the call.

Opportunities arise again and again in the course of a actor’s career. Follow your interests. Create and perform all kinds of different characters at every opportunity, and the future will be filled with many roles for you to book and play!

 


The Acting Center helps actors to gain control over their work, teaching them to rely on their own instincts, imagination and choices. Our scene study and improv classes produce confident actors who bring an original voice to every production.

In fact, the most distinctive thing about an Acting Center student is how different each one is. We train actors to speak in their own artistic voice—producing characters that are rich and layered. They become the artist they always wanted to be.

Theater, television and film are all collaborative mediums, so an actor must work well with other actors, directors, casting directors and many more. Our technique trains them to do just that! That’s why directors love to work with Acting Center students.

Commercial Acting— Training is Essential

March 16, 2018

 

Use what you know. Don’t worry about what you don’t know.

—Michael Shurtleff, playwright, casting director, and author

Maybe your friends tell you, “You’re so attractive, you should be in commercials!” Or perhaps you’ve been approached at the mall by a talent agent who says your child is a natural and it’ll be easy to get her into commercials.

Acting in commercials has the lure of seeming to be a simple profession. Everyone believes it’s easy to get into, easy to achieve quick success, and of course you will make piles of money!

But as commercial director Kevin Emmons says about a British actor: “I was working with this actor on a shoot. He was classically trained and brilliant, and he is now suddenly in front of a teleprompter with all these lines, and he has to do this specific action while walking and talking . . . and by the third take he was overwhelmed. He said he acted his whole life and this [commercial stuff] is hard!”

Good actors make commercial acting look easy. However, saying words that are product-driven with little- to-no time to practice or rehearse, getting virtually no background explanation whatsoever, making it look like you’re having an everyday conversation with a friend in front of complete strangers while the camera is rolling—it is all a lot more challenging than it looks.

A student in his late 50s took my 6-week A-Z commercial class. He was a successful ear/nose/throat surgeon, and typically impatient. After the final class he asked, “How long does it take to get a job?”

“Well, how long did it take you before you began prac- ticing surgery?” I asked with a smile.

He said, “Four years of college, two years of grad school and four years in a residency.”

“Okay, and so what makes you think you can master commercial acting in six weeks?” I said with a little glint in my eye and steel in my tone. He was speechless.

Casting director Ross Lacy told me once, “I always laugh when someone says, ‘Omigosh, I would like to be in commercials,’ and I say, ‘Sure you would! So would everybody. That’s why these people are training and go to improv classes all night long because they make it look easy—and it’s not! And the people who think it is are mistaken!’

Ross continues, “The one thing I know is that training is imperative if you want a lasting career in commercials. Of course there are stories of the person who walked in, booked the job, and made a pile of money off one spot. This is definitely the exception. The same odds apply to winning the lottery.”

Just like my acting student /surgeon, most people wouldn’t dream of trying to start a new career in any field other than acting without getting the proper training, doing whatever it takes to make themselves competitive.


Judy Kain is an actress who has appeared in over 400 commercials. Most recently, she has had recurring roles on The Fosters, Hand Of God and The Odd Couple. Judy currently teaches acting and business of acting classes at her acting school, Keep It Real Acting Studios, in North Hollywood, California.

Finding the Character’s Dramatic Need in Their Life & In The Journey of the Script

March 15, 2018

When I began to study screenwriting with Syd Field, one of the major principles that he taught me was Dramatic Need and it really struck a chord with me. Below is a discussion of how now, years later, I teach dramatic need to actors, writers, and directors.

What does the Character Want?

Wherein, we delve into discovering the golden nugget that keeps actors connected, grounded, and fighting for something that is essential to the character’s existence. In its simplest terms, what is it that the character wants? Answering this question specifically will be crucial and inescapable. For every scene, character, and audition that the actor brings to life, he will have to know, who is the character and what do they want.

What is the Character’s Objective?

The most common way of describing and instilling into actors this concept of wanting something is done with the word, “objective.” Coaches and directors will incessantly ask, “What is your objective”? That is to say, what does the character want in the scene? What does the character want from the other character in the scene? What do they want for themselves? To find objectives, the actor can analyze the action and answer three questions: «What is my character doing physically and emotionally? Why is my character doing it? How will my character do it? » This creates the performance for the actor. This creates the character. Action is character, Syd used to tell us incessantly. It is through action that the actor understands and connects with the main ideas and themes in the script that the writer is attempting to convey. It is through actions that characters pursue their objectives.

In human nature, desire is essential. We are always in the quest for something. For purposes of creating character, Syd Field defines this notion of desire as, “what does the character want to win, gain, or achieve in the journey of the screenplay?” Before writing anything, it is crucial to understand the main character, so that the writer can better develop the situations he will be creating for his character in the screenplay.

The writer has to create all the elements for his story from scratch. The actor has the blueprint and the clues that the writer has provided, for interpreting and deciphering the character’s desires. I like the name that Syd Field has given this concept of desire. He calls it the Character’s Dramatic Need. I find it much more colorful and heightened than objective.

In a script, we generally see a portion of a character’s life. Even if it is a biographic picture, it is impossible to show everything about a person’s life in 120 minutes. As a consequence, we end up seeing only a slice of the character’s life. Usually in this window of life, there is something that the character must uncover or fight for. This becomes their Dramatic Need.

It is dramatic because on several levels what the character wants is urgent. It is dramatic because in this sliver of life, the circumstances and obstacles that the character is encountering are life altering. The character’s Dramatic Need is driving the story line and thus providing the script with the different avenues for the “drama potential.”

What the character wants is a need because it is not a whim or a passing fancy. Their lives are usually at stake, literally and/or metaphorically. Achieving the goal or not, is usually what the story is about and what keeps the viewer hooked. A character’s Dramatic Need provides them with their purpose. It is their most heartfelt wish.

When exploring the objectives of a character, the actor should start with the global ones first. What is their overall objective in life? What is the purpose of their life? What is their purpose in the journey of the script? What about at this moment in their life? The actions that the actor chooses to play for the character are governed consciously and subconsciously by what the character wants.

For purposes of clarity, let’s make a distinction between Objective and Dramatic Need.

Throughout life, objectives may change but usually the core impetus, the dramatic need within, stays consistent, even if one is not able to consciously define it. Our objectives change because we are a wanting animal and when we achieve one objective, we are ready to tackle another. That is why life is a journey. We cannot know all the answers in advance. We must be in the doing and then things will unravel and be revealed. The answers will come.

When I did my own personal list of objectives, I found that they were, above all, work related. So, I dig deeper and ask myself WHY? Why do I want all these things? Where does this desire come from? Well, if I start way back when I was fourteen years old in Honduras, I was a child of divorced parents; awkward, lonely, misplaced in a bourgeois, superficial society, where the arts were frowned upon. I felt stifled. Yet, in the after-school drama club I felt like I belonged. We created other realities, imaginary ones, and that was fun! I discovered I could express my feelings, and those of others. Once I discovered this possibility, I knew I had to leave my country. My overall Dramatic Need in life was for expression, freedom, and achieving “the impossible.” Psychological events and the circumstances surrounding my persona helped to establish that.

As I have gone through my life, my immediate objectives have changed but my overall Dramatic Need for expression, creativity, dreams, freedom, and autonomy, has remained consistent. WHY? Why must I do this? Perhaps because, from my Point of View, I was left alone and abandoned by my father. He was absent and unavailable to me so, I have the NEED to prove that I can succeed, and on my terms.

Knowing the main objectives will also help in choosing the immediate, moment-to-moment objectives that appear in each scene. Knowing the Dramatic Need drives everything. It is a tank of fuel that feeds the performance engine. Everything becomes clearer if we understand the big picture. By knowing where the character is headed, the writer, the actor, and the director can create the steps that must be accomplished to get there.


Natalia Lazarus is the Artistic Director at the helm of the Los Angeles Performing Arts Conservatory & its subsidiaries. In addition, Ms. Lazarus is also a private and international coach for Hollywood celebrities on sets (most notably Ken Jeong of The Hangover, Community & Knocked Up; Teresa Ruiz from Border Town with Jennifer Lopez; and in institutions throughout the world, like Bridge Media, The International School of Cinema of Paris, the Guanajuato Film Festival, Casa Azul in Mexico City, River Hollywood Training School in Tokyo Japan, Instituto Stanislavsky in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists in Los Angeles.

Product Identity and Your Brand

February 16, 2018

 

A successful career in the arts and especially in the performing arts is difficult to think about as a product. After all, a human being is involved. The preparation necessary to become an actor is specific and requires an expenditure of dedication, time, and money.

By definition, your career is a focused application of a skill designed to provide earnings and satisfaction. Thus, no matter how personal an endeavor an acting career may be, certain principles of basic marketing can and do apply and ought to be employed even by the artist.

The proliferation of social media and the emphasis of having an online presence have created a marketplace crowded with options and information proclaiming the virtues of every product from toothpicks to artificial hearts. The focus on marketing offers has become essential.

Marketing – of any product – can be reduced to three essential principles: Product identity, packaging, and placement. When understood and effectively employed, these principles can help you navigate the overcrowded marketplace and enhance the prospect of success.

The “grandmother” of these principles is the first, product identity. Without a cleverly discerned and properly articulated statement of product identity, the second two principles, packaging and placement, aren’t even possible.

It doesn’t take many interviews or auditions for an actor to realize that there’s more going on in a casting session than simply how proficiently a scene is read. It’s obvious that there are other factors at play besides the quality of your craftsmanship. And because you are not able to see the audition from their point of view, it is impossible to understand how they perceive the work, the “product”.

Product identity is pretty simple when you’re marketing toothpicks or even artificial hearts. If you’re trying to market one of those products, you can put it on a table in front of you, you can see it from the same angles as a potential buyer can see it. You can invite others to look at it with you. You can appreciate the item from their point of view and, thus, interpret the reactions they may have to the product. It isn’t the same when you are the product.

What can you do about it? Find out what’s going on in that outside point of view and integrate it with your interior point of view.

By taking these two essential actions, the two aspects of personal product identity can be a unified. From having the right photographs to having an effective website and social media presence to giving truly memorable auditions you can more effectively market your identity – your brand.

The above has been at the core of the Sam Christensen Process that I’ve been offering for almost thirty years. 2018 marks the final year that I’ll be teaching my Process in person. I’m leaving Los Angeles and I’ll be presenting an on-line version of the image and marketing work I invented. So, experience the Process as I created it – and enjoy the confidence and ease it produce as you build your career.


About Sam Christiansen:

Sam has had a career of well deserved lucky breaks (Public Theatre -New Talent, Arthur Laurent’s assistant, Broadway Company Manager; Casting director-M*A*S*H, Clash of The Titans, The Champ; Personal Manager-Brian Stokes Mitchell, Jean Claude VanDamme, Rita Wilson) all of which lead him to create his landmark personal branding system and a lifetime of close personal work with actors. (Leslie Jones, Drew Carey, Dan Harmon, Will Wheaton, etc)

Conscious Auditioning (pt. 2)

January 16, 2018

Conscious in the Room

This one would seem to be obvious—of course you’re going to be conscious in the room where you’re about to audition, that’s what you’re there for! But it’s sometimes harder than it sounds to remain totally conscious and completely present when your brain is racing around taking in all of the new stimuli and your heart is beating fast with excitement and anticipation.

I have heard many actors tell me they lose their confidence when they walk into the room, and all of their work goes out the window during the read. They feel as if they weren’t really there.

This is when you can lean on the body to stabilize you. When you walk in and take your place, take a moment and feel your feet on the floor. Gather strength from the grounded sensation of being firmly rooted to the earth and then take an energizing breath that expands the upper chest, opens the shoulders, and straightens your posture. Now you’ve truly taken your space and are ready to work.

When it comes time for the reading, it’s important that you’ve prepared in a way that allows you to let go and trust that your hard work will shine thorough with the ease and confidence of the true professional. If you feel yourself pushing or going flat or otherwise losing consciousness, it’s essential that you immediately reconnect with your listening. If you’ve done the work of fleshing out the relationships in the piece, listening will retrigger your emotional connection, allowing you to relax back into the rhythm of a true conversation.

The more you feel grounded the more conscious you’ll be as you move from moment to moment—free to listen, react and respond.

It takes focused, conscious work to deliver a great audition, but with a solid technique as your guide you’ll ensure that all of your auditions will be alive with humanity: interesting, fun, and surprising.

 


Craig WallaceCraig Wallace’s background in script development combined with his 16 years of coaching actors enables him to find the job getting moments that others miss. His expertise in breaking down text and years of coaching experience has made him “L.A.’s go to private coach.” Sign up for his group or private classes at wallaceauditiontechnique.com.

The Three Pillars of Comedy (Part 3 of 3)

November 15, 2017

THE UNPREDICTABLE

Storyline The element of surprise is at the heart of any successful sitcom. In terms of storyline, the unpredictable is what keeps us laughing out loud and tuning in week after week. We know the character will want something desperately and will pursue it with comedic gusto. What we don’t know is how they’re going to go about getting their Want, what will stand in their way, or what will happen if and when they do get their Want. If boy wants girl, we know boy will pursue girl. What we can’t predict is how he’ll go about it, what obstacles he’ll face and how he’ll totally screw it up.

Characters – In sitcoms, there is an inherent, unpredictable nature 
to all comedic characters. What makes a good sitcom character is a funny writer with a fresh, humorous perspective on human nature, and a funny actor who brings their own life experience, essence and unique spin to the role. As you will see, each of e Eight Characters of Comedy has room for interpretation, a distinctive “take,” which will naturally make them unpredictable.

That being said, there is one character who is a walking, talking personification of the unpredictable and that is the In Their Own Universe character. However, it’s important to note that each character will come with its own surprises. For example, if a Logical Smart One
 is given an A or B storyline, they could take on the characteristics of another character, like The Neurotic (anxious, over-thinking, fussy) in the desperate pursuit of their Want.

It’s important to note, there is also some humor to be derived from “The Predictable,” especially regarding characters that we are familiar with and have grown to love. We know them and their personalities so well, and we look forward to their funny reactions or their particular style in delivering jokes. They are so well-defined in our minds that
 we know what they say or do is going to be hilarious. But where the element of the unpredictable comes into play is that we don’t know exactly what it is they are going to say or do to make us laugh.

Jokes Jokes are built upon the element of the unpredictable. One particular joke that encompasses this unpredictability, which goes back to the advent of sitcoms, is what I named a Triplet. Triplets are based on the theory that a joke starts by establishing a familiar pattern in the dialogue or action which lulls us into a sense of comfort, as we think we know what’s going to happen next based on that pattern. Then, we are suddenly thrust out of that comfort zone when that pattern is broken or disrupted by something “unfamiliar” (the joke) at the end.

We might know that a joke is coming, but we can’t predict when, what it’s going to be, or, even more important, how clever. We also can’t predict the speed, volume, intensity or intention of how the actor will deliver this joke.

As you can see, there is a lot that goes into building this sitcom house. You need to have The Three Pillars of Comedy working together to support the continued success of a good sitcom. You cannot remove any one of them from the equation. Conflict, Desperation and The Unpredictable will serve as the basis for most, if not all, of the humor in any sitcom. They all need to be present in the storylines, characters and jokes. Again, you can’t neglect any of those elements either. You can’t have a brilliant storyline with weak characters and jokes. The Three Pillars of Comedy will hold up your sitcom house and reinforce it episode-to-episode and season-to-season.


Scott SeditaAbout Scott Sedita – Whether you’re auditioning for a co-star or a series regular on a half hour comedy, sitcom guru and acting coach Scott Sedita will teach you The Sedita Method of sitcom acting, which comes with it’s own terminology, coined phrases and unique glossary.

Scott’s internationally best-selling book, “The Eight Characters of Comedy. A Guide to Sitcom Acting & Writing, 2nd Edition” has sold over 100,000 copies and has become a “bible” to Hollywood comedy writers, directors, producers, and actors and is used as a textbook in over 100 colleges and universities. Find Scott and his staff of professional actors, teachers and coaches at ScottSeditaActing.com.

Three Tips to Succeed This Episodic Season

July 17, 2017

Episodic season is the time of year when the episodes of many TV shows are being cast. With TV pilots now sold and the leading actors hired, the casting of recurring roles, guest stars and co-stars begins.  This is when working actors have a chance to get really busy.  This is the time when you want to prepare to get into the audition room and nail it.

But how exactly does one do that?

Here are three tips that can help. Let’s start with:

1) RESEARCH.  

When researching an already existing show you can watch the show to see what its style and characters are like. Sometimes, as in the case of new series, the shows haven’t yet aired. Here you are tasked to figure out what the tone of the show is, what the world is, and what the style will be like just from a few script pages.  This is where you can make a huge mistake, simply because you can’t get familiar with the specifics of a show that doesn’t exist yet.  It’s like getting an invitation to a party, without telling you what kind of party it is.

Where do you start?

Look at the Script. Gather as much information as you can from your script. You can ask your agent or manager for any additional information, or to get you a copy of the entire script so you can read it and find out how and where your scenes fit in to the overall story.  But if you can’t get the whole script, work with what you have. Pretty common sense, but what else can you do?

Be a detective. One way to gather a lot of good “intel” on a role is to look up the show creator and his/her style in the present or past projects.  Watch their shows.  What is the style of portrayal– realistic, low-key, stylized, quite broad or theatrical?  What sorts of characters do they place in their worlds?

If the show is a comedy, can you get a clue as to their sense of humor?

Consider if any of the style points you have noted will translate to this project and see if you can find a way to integrate that into your audition. You will stand a better chance of fitting into this new story if you are able to operate within the same basic creative approach.

2) CREATE A UNIQUE CHARACTER

Strive to make an interesting choice.  You will have much more impact if you present a role in your own unique way, different from what anyone else might bring. Your audition will stick out from the crowd if it is unique, not a cookie cutter duplicate that others are also likely to present.

Ask yourself what about the role interests YOU and what can you bring to it that no one else would. That’s what casting agents mean when they ask you to “make bold choices.”

Be specific with your character. What do they like, don’t like, what is their viewpoint on things? Create a real person with a life and then live that life in the script.

3) BE READY FOR ANYTHING

Take the stress out of it. Leave plenty of time to get to the audition, to park and prepare yourself to go in—so you are not feeling rushed. Often at an audition, unusual things will happen that you couldn’t have predicted at home; script changes, last minute character adjustments, phones going off in the room. Be ready for what may come up.

Have confidence in what you are doing. Through research and drilling, be so ready with your choices that nothing can shake you. If you are prepared, and understand the world of the show as much as possible, even if they don’t cast you for this one, you will stick out in their minds for the next project.

Present yourself as a professional, they will at the very least come away knowing that, and that’s the kind of impression you want to make on casting agents in this, and every season of your career.

 


 

The Acting Center helps actors to gain control over their work, teaching them to rely on their own instincts, imagination and choices. Our scene study and improv classes produce confident actors who bring an original voice to every production.

In fact, the most distinctive thing about an Acting Center student is how different each one is. We train actors to speak in their own artistic voice—producing characters that are rich and layered. They become the artist they always wanted to be.

Theater, television and film are all collaborative mediums, so an actor must work well with other actors, directors, casting directors and many more. Our technique trains them to do just that! That’s why directors love to work with Acting Center students.

 

 

 

 

 

The one thing it takes to be a great artist

June 23, 2017

The start of a new year inevitably brings with it a list of goals: taking new photos, editing your reel, signing up for scene study and on-camera classes, sharpening your improv skills, finding new representation, going on more auditions.

The list can go on and on (and on), and every single one of those things is a good, tangible intention to set.

But amidst all the practical, proactive goals you’ll set out to accomplish, there is one thing you can’t forget, one thing that needs to drive you through all of it: You have to want to reach that excellence in yourself. If you don’t truly want it with all of your heart and soul, that list won’t mean anything, even if every single box gets checked.

Ask yourself: What does it take to be a great artist? How far do you have to push yourself? How does genius flourish? Do you have to bleed in order to hit your potential? How far do you need to go to be the best that you can be? What will motivate you to get there? Should you look for a teacher or a mentor that will stop at nothing to get to excellence in you? What does it mean to push yourself and work hard in acting? What is it that you truly have to do? How many hours do you have put in to succeed? What material do you have to work on to soar?

You have to feel like you have no choice, that your love and passion for the work is a conduit, a driving force. You have to crank up the desire to do the best work you are capable of and let yourself feel that ambition. You have to stay determined to succeed even when the going gets rough, even when all you’re hearing is rejection. Let yourself get up time and time again because you know your potential, and you know you have it in you to deliver the goods.

Make the promise to yourself not to betray what you know you can accomplish and put yourself in the position to do the work. Give it every ounce of creative energy in you. Once you’ve made that resolution, don’t back down or let anything stop you in the pursuit of that. You will aspire to nothing less than your biggest dreams and you will not settle.

And when you find yourself winning people over as you strive for greatness, exciting them with your potential, you’ll know that it’s what you really, truly want and that you’ve given it everything you have.


 

MicMICHELLE DANNERhelle Danner is a renowned acting coach who works with A-List Actors privately as well as on set. Michelle trained with Stella Adler and Uta Hagen and was voted favorite acting coach by Backstage readers and featured coaching Andy Richter on The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien.  Michelle has two books coming out in 2016, The Daily Ritual and The Golden Box.  Please find more about Michelle and her acting programs and classes at michelledanner.com.

Next Page »