They Break Me Down

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A number of years ago, The Acting Center was interviewing students about their careers and experiences as actors. Many students had recounted stories of ranting teachers, trying to use tortured memories for scene work and being embarrassed in front of their fellow classmates in an effort to learn acting. One interview, from an experienced actor, stood out that day. “They all say they are breaking you down to build you back up,” he said, “but where’s the ‘building back up’ part? I just feel broken.”

He laughed. I was floored by his comment and it still haunts me.

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Acting is like any skill. Do it a lot and you get good at it. But just like riding a bike or learning to cook a soufflé, you have to get in there with the training wheels or practice making an omelet first. You certainly don’t gain confidence in yourself in an environment where you’re made to feel embarrassed or uncertain about your work.

Actor training is exactly that: it is training to know how to become a character and learning to identify and express each emotion as that unique person. A trained actor should also be able to layer on each part of a character and deliver the whole personality package—physical traits, attitudes about life, thoughts, rhythms, what the character has to say and more. And when an experienced performer does it well? The audience believes the character and is swept away in the story.

So what’s all this about “breaking down” a performer?

A performer needs to be BUILT UP at every turn. An acting school needs to provide lots of effective exercises that drill each particular skill an actor needs to be their very best at auditions, on set and on stage.

A school needs to provide lots of time during class for an actor to practice so they gain self-confidence.

A school needs to provide lots of stage time so the actor can overcome nerves and get comfortable in front of an audience.

And a school needs a kind, caring staff that is helping each artist succeed in achieving their dreams.

So get into a class where you can gain certainty in your work, one that builds you up—not breaks you down.

At The Acting Center, we are committed to building up artists, one-by-one, in every class.


Written by April Biggs, Executive Director of The Acting Center

7 Ways TV Commercials Can Help Build Your Television and Film Career

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  1. TV Commercials are the fastest way to get on national television, make great residual income and begin building a recognizable brand in the TV/Film casting community.
  1. The Actors Search! When you do a National Commercial, due to the hundreds of times it runs on television, the exposure can lead to a TV/Film Casting Director that is casting a project calling you in to audition because you fit the type they are looking for in one of the roles they are casting.
  1. Commercial Casting Directors that also cast films. Some Commercial Casting Directors also cast Independent and major Films. When you work well with commercial casting offices you can also get called in to audition for Films.
  1. Commercial Directors that also direct television shows. The Russo Brothers, Ridley Scott, Joe Pytka etc…are Television and Film Directors that also direct TV Commercials. When you work well on-set on a TV Commercial, you will be remembered and favored in casting offices, by Commercial Directors that also direct TV and Film.
  1. Commercials to put on your Theatrical Demo Reel! The “Slice of Life” TV commercial (the 30 second scene in a sitcom type of commercials) can be put on your Theatrical Demo Reel. Some Theatrical Agents even request it as it can help the Agent pitch you for certain TV/Film roles, especially when you don’t have a reel.
  1. On-Camera Audition Skill Building. Some of your TV/Film auditions will be recorded in the Casting Directors office and sent to the Director. Most Scene Study and Improv classes are not on-camera so the actor does not develop the skills needed to audition well at TV/Film castings when being recorded on-camera. All work in our 4 Week Course is done on-camera. Helping the actor build great audition technique skills that are necessary and helpful in TV/Film Casting Offices.
  1. The fastest way to become SAG/AFTRA and make all or most of the money back quickly to regain the dues you had to spend to join the Union (Guild). Moreover, most major TV/Film Casting Directors will not audition you for television shows and films if you are not SAG/AFTRA. Your major TV/Film career trajectory will accelerate when you become SAG/AFTRA. Commercials can help you get there faster!

mikepointer

Booking Coach Mike Pointer of Hey, I Saw Your Commercial! Has helped thousands of actors over the last 17 years book hundreds of national television commercials as well as television and film work. Coach Mike, a successful commercial actor for over 28 years himself, teaches outstanding, cutting edge strategies that has helped hundreds of actors quit their day jobs, and build a successful career in TV commercials. Coach Mike’s powerful on-camera techniques and outstanding business strategies has set a new standard and cutting edge approach in the on-camera commercial training industry. These classes are highly recommended by top commercial agencies as well as top Managers, and Casting Directors that also teach classes!

Commercials – A Slice Of Life

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Hundreds of years ago (well maybe it just seems that long ago) I moved to Los Angeles to be an actress and a singer. Like most people, I was told the way to become an actress and get a TV/film career was to start out in commercials. Well, in those years I did fit the qualifications for a young mom, a girl who loved pizza and someone who loved to be traveling on an airline. So I immediately went out and found a commercial agent who agreed that I had the perfect look. They even gave me a commercial copy to read – I don’t think I was very good at it but they traded my lack of knowledge for my bubbly personality.

I was a speech therapist during my early 20’s so after I taught I would go on these auditions where I would get to know all of the commercial actress’s in my category. In the beginning, it was intimidating as I recognized many of them from actual television commercials. The process was the same. I would get a call from my agent telling me to show up at a certain casting office. I would sign in and then be given the copy of the commercial. I was very nervous because all I did was read it over a few times and hope that I wouldn’t bomb in the audition! That did happen a lot but eventually I began to understand what they were looking for and started to book them. I did so well that I bought a house with the money that I had earned. It was a fun game. Run home to open the mailbox and guess how much money I made that month on a national commercial.

Looking back, the only thing I liked about commercials was the money. I didn’t have “Margie Haber” to teach me that a commercial is a small slice of life. The creation of one line, 2 lines, 2 paragraphs or 2 pages is the same for a commercial, a co-star or guest star, a series regular or a film. It is all about creating the life. All of the commercials I did would have been so much more awarding if I understood that premise. Pizza Hut, American Airlines, Formula 409 and Tang were opportunities to experience the life – to use my imagination and live it.   One commercial was Tang with Florence Henderson. In that commercial I had a child and went to visit my neighbor (Florence Henderson) and we sat on her patio drinking her Tang loving the taste of it. I didn’t know that I could actually create a life for my “character” rather than worry about my lines. I could have said,” I am this person living this life” – what was it like to have a child?  Did I watch her play sports or listen to her playing the piano? What was our ritual before I tucked her in bed? Create my relationship with my neighbor. How often did we come over on a hot summer and sit on the porch drinking Tang and sharing stories of our day – not trying to sell the drink Tang. If you want to see my commercials in the 70s and 80s they are on my “Stop acting” app that you can find on your iphone/ipad or vimeo on demand.

My advice – don’t be technical – create any life and enjoy the process!

 


M_HaberLogo_Photo

With 40 years of experience, Margie Haber is known as Hollywood’s top audition coach. What is it that Margie teaches? The answer to that question is within title of her book:  Margie teaches actorsHow to Get the Part Without Falling Apart.  Margie takes away the “three p’s”- Pain, Panic, and Performance Anxiety- from the cold-reading & audition process and gives back the “Big P” – POWER- to the actor.  She teaches actors her philosophy, “Stop Acting and Start Living the Life”, using her unique 10-step approach to breakdown the slice of life physically and emotionally, rather than intellectually.  Her revolutionary Haber Phrase Technique has helped thousands of actors use to use the page without losing the life, while supporting relationship and purpose. MargieHaber.com (310) 854-0870

Your child is so cute, they should be on TV!

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How many times have parents heard that? As an actress and acting coach, many parents ask me about how to get their kids started in the business, oftentimes because they’ve been told their child is cute!

My first thought is,”has the child expressed an interest in wanting to act?” If the answer is yes, then get them into an on-camera acting class.   It’s no different than if your child was interested in dancing, gymnastics or playing a sport. You’d enroll them in a sports league or class, right? Do the same for a child who wants to act.

Like many things kids try, some will love acting and others will decide they’d rather be on the playground, or WATCHING TV rather than being ON TV. But if they love it, having taken a class will give them the beginning tools and confidence they need to walk into an audition room knowing what to expect. THAT can make a huge difference in which cute child gets the job.

The Whole Package | Part 3 of what directors look for from actors in auditions

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In the past two “what directors are looking for” articles we covered how essential the first 10 seconds of the audition are, as well as the importance of listening and reacting.

One of the other topics that the directors I work with love to talk about is how they’ll only hire actors who they see as “the whole package” in the audition room. We discussed what that meant in terms of the actor’s work as well as their presence in the room. Let’s take a look:

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THE WORK

One of the most important skills that tell directors that they’re looking at the real thing is the actor’s ability to create compelling moments in the scene. Directors are waiting to be “hooked” in a new and exciting way.

Most of the time, in real life, we don’t speak in long complete groupings of sentences. We go from smooth, to static. We make sounds and we catch our breath if we get surprised and slowly let it out when we recover. We’re really interesting!

And yet, so many times in auditions, directors complain that actors have taken the life out of the piece. I realize this is most likely in an effort to look prepared and professional, but it’s not real or honest. If you’re connected to yourself, we’ll know that the rough edges are a choice and not a mistake.

The next time you’re speaking with someone, notice the moments of the conversation that make them unique; the pauses, the breaths, the chuckles etc. And then be aware of the moments you take and how you take them.

For your next audition, take those moments! Directors won’t hire someone who looks like they’re reading off a teleprompter. They will hire the actor who has the ability to create a real three-dimensional human being and who expresses themselves in a singular rhythm – quirks and all.

Another element of being the whole package is taking a strong point of view on the material – not hedging bets. Actors too often prepare in a way that they feel will please the people in the room – second guessing instead of committing. Of course, look at the breakdown and don’t go nuts! But at the same time, don’t audition down to what you believe the expectations of the people in the room are. Lift the material up with the decisions that you make and exceed everyone’s expectations. This may feel risky at first, but if you have a way of preparing that has brought out the strongest and most compelling qualities that you have to offer, you’ll feel safe enough to take that risk. It’s your only choice to show the people in the room, especially the director, that you have the ability to make your scene(s) come alive in way that takes the whole project to a higher level.

THE ROOM

Simply put, everything that you do in the room has to give the people watching you the confidence to hire you. They’re not just hiring your work, they’re hiring the person, and they need to know that the person that will be showing up on the set is strong, confident and in charge of themselves.

Actors who know how to book the job don’t need the perfect environment in order to be great. They walk in, look around, see the frazzled casting director, the high-strung producer and the network person on his phone, take a breath, smile and say “this is my stage today.” By not fighting the circumstances of the room, they’re taking the position of power. This acceptance makes you the calm, compelling center of all of the room’s activity. And this acceptance extends to all that you are as a person. No self-judgement, shame or hiding. Directors love actors who are in full acceptance and ownership of their entire being.

Now that you’ve accepted the room, the people in it and yourself – take charge! And you are in charge of the room in that you are the only active element in it. Everyone else is in the passive position of watching. You alone can affect the environment in a positive way. If your preparation is everything it needs to be, you can be confident in knowing that your seamless, dynamic work will be more than enough to change the room for the better.

The bar is high in auditions, isn’t it? You need to explode into the piece in the first 10 seconds, have the type of listening and reacting that captivates and surprises, create moments that stand up in the room as the strong, whole person who can handle anything that the job has to offer.

With such high stakes, it’s important that you have a way of working that brings pure joy and energy to your auditions. If you have a process you love, the love will also be in the work and that will make you pretty darn irresistible!


CraigWallaceCraig Wallace’s background in script development combined with his 16 years of coaching actors enables him to find the job getting moments that others miss. His expertise in breaking down text and years of coaching experience has made him “L.A.’s go to private coach.” Sign up for his group or private classes at wallaceauditiontechnique.com

We all need affirmation (part 2)

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In part one of ‘We All Need Affirmation!’ we discussed the power of positive affirmations and the exercise of changing negative thoughts to positive ones. Next is an exercise on how to counter those negative ideas and thoughts that can linger.

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Exercise: I am good enough to be great.

Of course, remnants of your negative thoughts will still linger. Let me show you how to counter those nagging negative thoughts with an even more positive thought.

This next Affirmation will be all encompassing to your life as well as your career. Once again, write this down in your Actor’s Journal:

I am good enough.

Now clear your mind, close your eyes, take a breath, and say it out loud five times:

I am good enough.

As you repeat this Affirmation to yourself over and over, some flashes of a past negative event may play out in your mind like a home movie. You might become emotional as this negative experience runs through your mind. You might see someone telling you that you’re not good enough, not smart enough, not good looking enough or that you’re too fat, too skinny, too small, too tall. Or the event could have been much more specific, like you forgot your lines in a play, which left you feeling embarrassed or humiliated. It’s something that left a deep scar.

Acknowledge this negative event, and the thought and emotions that go with it. Exhale and let the negative thought start to evaporate. Counter this negative thought with a more passionate, positive thought. Open your eyes and say:

I am good enough.

Say it as many times as you need to wash that negative thought away. Feel it and experience it slipping from your mind. You should feel relief as you allow yourself to be rid of the negative thoughts that surround that negative event. Hear the words come out of your mouth. Listen to that single voice, that single Affirmation. Say it again, say it louder and stronger:

I am good enough.

Let’s take it one step further. Now, you’re going to say it directly to yourself. Walk over to a mirror, look yourself in the eyes, take a deep breath and say:

I am good enough.

Keep saying it until the person staring back at you believes it. Once you feel it in your body and you truly believe that you are good enough, take another deep breath and say:

I am good enough to be great.

You should feel stronger, exhilarated and more empowered. You have triggered the positive energy that you possess. You should feel a belief building in yourself. You have embraced your potential and you are ready to move forward and be great.


 

© Ron Rinaldi Photography www.ronrinaldi.comWhether you’re auditioning for a co-star or a series regular on a half hour comedy, sitcom guru and acting coach Scott Sedita will teach you The Sedita Method of sitcom acting, which comes with it’s own terminology, coined phrases and unique glossary.

Scott’s internationally best-selling book, “The Eight Characters of Comedy. A Guide to Sitcom Acting & Writing, 2nd Edition” has sold over 100,000 copies and has become a “bible” to Hollywood comedy writers, directors, producers, and actors and is used as a textbook in over 100 colleges and universities. Find Scott and his staff of professional actors, teachers and coaches at ScottSeditaActing.com.

Keep It Real!

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Be in the moment…moment to moment. Phrases familiar to almost every actor. I find that many actors give lip service to these phrases. Yeah, sure, be in the moment, got it, but they actually aren’t. Most acting classes teach traditional methods handed down by Stanislavski, Strasberg, Adler, Meisner and Hagen. They want the actor to be in the moment after script analysis, notice the first half of the word “anal”, working on beats, figuring out the emotional moments ahead of time, trying to determine the arc of the character which the author has already established. Hamlet dies!

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Actors like to be in control of their performances. However, I find that for the most part they are watching and judging themselves while acting to see how well they are following their pre-determined emotional roadmap. If you intellectually determine beat by beat what you think your emotional roadmap should be, by definition you are not in the moment because you have figured out the moment ahead of time. It can be tempting to do this but I believe it will leave you “acting” and not in the moment. Letting go of pre-determination and trusting how you actually feel takes courage. It means giving up the security blanket of knowing exactly what you “think” each moment should be in exchange for being in the unknown. If you make one singular decision of what you “think” a given moment should be, you have taken away the infinite responses we as human beings may have at any moment. Think of it as one possible response against the infinite.

In life we are never totally certain of how something will affect us until we experience it. If we are truthful with ourselves our emotions are not in our control. If we cannot control them in life, how can we control them in performance, unless we ignore them? Emotions need to flow naturally, spontaneously. This makes for an exciting, unpredictable performance. There is a quote I like by Clint Eastwood that states “this is the method of acting where you empty your brain and everything else is spontaneous.”

I think the fun of acting is in not knowing exactly what you are going to feel until the moment happens. In sports, would playing the game be as much fun if you knew the outcome ahead of time? Of course not. I believe that acting should be the same way. Then the moments aren’t right or wrong, they are just truthful or not. I believe that acting should be as life like as possible. If you know who you are in the scene and what you want and commit fully to the “circumstances,” your emotions will follow. Just like life, they may surprise you, making your performance deeper, richer and more exciting than anything that you may have mapped out in advance.

At my studio I truly emphasize being present. Being in the moment. Remember “it’s never what you think it is, anything can happen.”


alanfeinsteinheadshotAlan Feinstein teaches on-camera, scene study and true cold reading classes at his studio in Los Angeles and online.

About Alan: Alan has most recently starred in Traces an A.F.I.  short entered into the Berlin Film Festival and appeared in Nip Tuck, Crossing Jordan and N.Y.P.D. Blue. He has appeared in over 100 television productions, including series leads in The Runaways, Jigsaw John, Berrengers, Second Family Tree and more than 800 episodes of daytime drama.  He has co-starred opposite Peter Strauss and Peter O’Toole in Masada, Lindsay Wagner in The Two Worlds of Jenny Logan, and Vanessa Redgrave in Second Serve.  He also co-starred opposite Diane Keaton in the feature film Looking For Mr. Goodbar.

His roles on Broadway include his debut in Edward Albee’s Malcolm, and was picked by Tennessee Williams to play Stanley in the 25th anniversary production  of A Streetcar Named Desire.  He won the New York Drama Desk Award as Marco in Arthur Miller’s A View From the Bridge.

He has starred on stage at the Guthrie Theatre in The Price after having auditioned for playwright Arthur Miller.  He also starred in productions of Herb Gardener’s Conversations With My Father at Philadelphia’s Walnut Street Theatre and the Pioneer Theatre Company in Salt Lake City.  Alan has also performed at The Old Globe , The Long Wharf  Theatre, The Williamstown Summer Festival, The Alley Theatre, The Philadelphia Theatre Company, and was a member of the New York’s famed Circle Repertory Company.  Los Angeles appearances include Talley’s Folly at the Grove Theatre Center, David Mamet’s Lakeboat, directed by Joe Montegna at the Tiffany Theatre, Tina Howe’s One Shoe Off, the world premiere of The Sisters at the historic Pasadena Playhouse and Ghetto at the Mark Taper Forum.  He has also received 3 Los Angeles Drama-logue awards for  Cold Storage, Dancing in the End Zone, and for his performance as Jamie in Long Days Journey Into Night.

Audition with Confidence Using The Wallace Audition Technique

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Actors who want to regard the auditioning room as a place that brings out the best in themselves as opposed to a “necessary evil” in the casting process will want to strongly consider attending Craig Wallace’s classes to learn The Wallace Audition Technique. Craig’s clear, wise, knowledgeable, and caring voice consistently shines through whether you hear him speak or read his written word. He created the technique 17 years ago to give actors the skills and confidence to audition at their highest level in pursuit of television and film work.

Wallace classes are intimate, instructing small groups of eight or nine students. A large emphasis is placed on experiential learning whereas verbal instruction takes about 20-percent of class time.

“In a TV or film audition [casting professionals] don’t want to see a character; they want to see ‘you,'” Wallace says. “They want to see the particular set of possibilities that you, and only you, have to offer. So my technique gives you a way to go inside of yourself, to discover, and then to access these specific qualities that have the strongest resonance for any role that you’re auditioning for.”

Craig believes a severely under-taught, if not ignored, portion of acting instruction is how actors present themselves in the room. For this reason, he specifically covers the subject matter of how to run a room. “You have to be a strong presence in the room. You have to give the people in there the confidence to hire you.” After all, he believes an actor’s compelling presence determines 50-percent of the reason he or she lands a role.

Classes include Fundamentals to learn strategies to discover and cultivate your unique qualities; Master classes for a more deep and highly personalized approach to auditioning; and Casting Session classes which create a “real” casting environment accompanied with in-depth playback analysis. In addition, Craig offers by-appointment private coaching classes as well as career consultations to help actors efficiently and effectively achieve their short- and long-term goals.

You might recognize Craig Wallace by his many insightful online articles discussing a wide array of topics pertaining to auditioning. He also authored a highly reviewed book entitled The Best of You–Winning Auditions Your Way. Wallace drew his knowledge from many years of leadership experience with various top entertainment companies, specifically pertaining to talent and script development.

Here are some reviews from students who completed coursework with The Wallace Audition Technique:

“Craig is an amazing teacher. You can tell he genuinely cares about the students which I feel like is really rare. You’re not just a number. He actually cares about you as a person and an actor.”

“I think because he’s such a beautiful person, and teaches in such a beautiful, personal, specific way that the people that are attracted to classes are really lovely, genuine people.”

“[The classes have] a small, intimate vibe, and very safe and very comforting.”

“You feel like you walk away with a lot every time.”

Interested actors can learn more about his classes on The Wallace Audition Technique website.

 

We All Need Affirmation! (part one)

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When I was an agent in New York, I found that many of my young clients lacked the confidence they needed to book the job. Even though they were trained actors, something inside them (some negative voice or event) made them second-guess themselves, which interfered with their acting work. As much as I told them to “believe in themselves,” the seeds of self-doubt kept creeping into their conscious minds. I decided to take action. So I taught them the power of Affirmations.

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Affirmations are positive thoughts you speak out loud. They are designed to alter the way you think and feel about yourself. Affirmations invigorate you, encourage you and pump you up when you feel uninspired, deflated or defeated. There’s a lot of power in “thoughts”…positive ones and negative ones. Before I get to the positive ones, let me talk about those destructive, negative thoughts that attack your confidence level. Let me show you how to get rid of them.

Negative thoughts begin in your subconscious. They were planted there by past negative experiences or events. You could say your negative thoughts are a by-product of your negative experiences. These negative thoughts are formed into damaging statements that you say to yourself or speak out loud (sometimes in front of others):

“I’ll never be happy.”
“I look ugly.”
“I feel unworthy.”
“I’ll never be a good actor.” “I’ll never succeed.”

Do any of those negative thoughts or statements sound familiar? Are they part of your vocabulary? The problem is, when said often enough, your subconscious mind believes these negative thoughts or statements to be true. They become true only because you consciously believe them to be true. That’s how the vicious cycle of self-doubt begins and never ends. It’s these negative thoughts that prevent you from achieving your career goals.

First, you need to consciously stop planting those negative thoughts in your mind.

Second, you need to stop saying them out loud (be diligent in catching these negative thoughts). Finally, you have to reprogram those negative thoughts that have already taken up residence in your subconscious. The only way to reprogram them is to change them in your conscious mind.

Exercise: I am… 

Your first Affirmation is meant to uncover your negative thoughts and turn them into positive thoughts. Choose a negative statement you find yourself saying and change it to a positive statement. Make sure you start your positive statement with the words, “I am.” Those two words are very powerful and serve as a command meant to lead you to a positive outcome. Make sure you write down your positive statement in your Actor’s Journal.

For example, using the negative statements I mentioned earlier:

If you say, “I’ll never be happy,” change it to “I am happy.”

If you say, “I look ugly,” change it to “I am beautiful.”

If you say, “I feel unworthy,” change it to “I am worthy.”

If you say, “I’ll never be a good actor” change it to “I am a good actor.”

If you say, “I’ll never succeed,” change it to “I am succeeding.”

Positive affirmations need to start with a positive declaration. Look at what you wrote down and say it out loud. The more you say it, the more you’ll train both your conscious and subconscious mind to believe it.

As in acting, make sure those words, and the feelings behind them, come from somewhere deep inside you. Concentrate on what you’re saying and feel the negative thought leave your mind and body as you let the positive one in. Each time you say it, believe that you are truly letting go of your negative thoughts and the feelings that are attached to it. Believe in the positive words you are now saying.



SeditaImgWhether you’re auditioning for a co-star or a series regular on a half hour comedy, sitcom guru and acting coach Scott Sedita will teach you The Sedita Method of sitcom acting, which comes with it’s own terminology, coined phrases and unique glossary.

Scott’s internationally best-selling book, “The Eight Characters of Comedy. A Guide to Sitcom Acting & Writing, 2nd Edition” has sold over 100,000 copies and has become a “bible” to Hollywood comedy writers, directors, producers, and actors and is used as a textbook in over 100 colleges and universities. Find Scott and his staff of professional actors, teachers and coaches at ScottSeditaActing.com.

Four Questions You Never Ask In An Agent Meeting

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1. “I’m looking for an agent to really work hard for me.”

Reason not to ask: The agent will more than likely believe that you have unrealistic expectations of how often you should be getting auditions, and will become a nuisance by calling and emailing them every day. The agent will also believe that you should assume that every agent would work hard for you as it’s the only way for both of you to make money.

2. “How many clients do you have?”

Reason not to ask: How many clients the agent has should not matter to you. Some actors are on an agents’ rosters but they are not active, being booked out, on maternity leave, sick, on tour,or just not getting auditions as often, because they are not getting enough callbacks per audition etc… The fact of the matter is that the agent is expressing interest in YOU by calling you in to a meeting to discuss representation. The agency is not going to reduce the number of their client roster to make you feel better about your position with them.

3. “What casting offices do you work with?”

Reason not to ask: The agent will more than likely say, “All of them.” Then, the agent may turn the question around and ask you, “Now, which casting offices are familiar with your work?” Possibly putting you in an uncomfortable position. If you do your homework properly and know who the top agents are to pursue, then you will know the agent you are meeting with has great relationships with major casting offices, eliminating this question.

4. “How many actors do you have that are my type?”

Reason not to ask: The reason you don’t ask this question is similar to the reason in question 2, but it’s a more specific question to you, so it needs to be addressed. If the agent is calling you in for a meeting, they are interested in possibly signing you. Whether they have plenty of your type or don’t have your type at all, there’s some need for your look at their agency. It’s even possible that they have three of your type already, but one has several national commercial conflicts. The other is always booking out for whatever reason, and another gets avails, but never actually books the job. How many of your type the agent has is irrelevant. What matters is their interest in you and the casting opportunities they provide you once you are signed.

 


 

mikepointer

Booking Coach Mike Pointer of Hey, I Saw Your Commercial! Has helped thousands of actors over the last 17 years book hundreds of national television commercials as well as television and film work. Coach Mike, a successful commercial actor for over 28 years himself, teaches outstanding, cutting edge strategies that has helped hundreds of actors quit their day jobs, and build a successful career in TV commercials. Coach Mike’s powerful on-camera techniques and outstanding business strategies has set a new standard and cutting edge approach in the on-camera commercial training industry. These classes are highly recommended by top commercial agencies as well as top Managers, and Casting Directors that also teach classes!